52 Ancestors, Brick Wall, Genealogy Travel, Research

Finding Siblings

I had been on the trail for several years, looking for the siblings of John Adams of Chequer Hall, County Antrim, Ireland. The only sibling I knew about was a brother named James, who received £50 in John's will. Family stories say that John and James were business partners. But without known parents and thin… Continue reading Finding Siblings

52 Ancestors, Documents, Research

Creating a Map

Maps are a big part of my genealogy research. It's a great way to orient yourself to a location and there are lots of different types of maps. There are maps just for census and property records. For example, for 19th century Irish ancestors, this Griffiths Valuation site allows you to fade out the historical… Continue reading Creating a Map

52 Ancestors, Documents, Research

Distant Cousins

"Talk to Pat," my dad said. I had been looking at the family of my ancestors, Oswell and Anne Moore Eve, and found some conflicting information about Oswell's religion. A granddaughter of Oswell and Anne claimed that Oswell was a Quaker and this was published far and wide. My research of Quaker documents told a… Continue reading Distant Cousins

52 Ancestors, Research

My Brother is My Son-in-law

On 23 November 1788, Mary Elizabeth Eve was the fourth child born to Oswell Eve and Aphra Ann Pritchard. She joined three older sisters and would be followed by six more sisters and five brothers, including John Pritchard Eve, who was born 24 June 1800. He was the 11th child and the last one born… Continue reading My Brother is My Son-in-law

52 Ancestors, Biography, Research

Zehn Kinder

Eleanora Wissig was one of my 3rd great-grandmothers. She was born 22 July 1835 in the Duchy of Nassau (in modern-day Germany). She immigrated to the United States before 1856 and lived in St. Louis, Missouri, where there was a large German population. She married my 3rd great-grandfather, (John) Adam Roth, 22 November 1856. He… Continue reading Zehn Kinder

52 Ancestors, Places, Research

From Antrim to Augusta

Sources are essential to genealogical research. Typical sources include census records, birth and death records, marriage records, an so on. These sources provide various bits of information for the facts of an ancestor's life. Sometimes in a search, or through serendipity, a unique or unusual source will come to light. These might include journals and… Continue reading From Antrim to Augusta